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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
. to make sure iraq is an effective partner with us. >> this is not yet a country of peace, and it may not be for a long time. after seven years of violence, it is a country that feels itself to be free once again. the acting prime minister, nouri al maliki, announced today that iraq was once more sovereign and independent. the point of the american involvement here, supposedly, was to liberate the iraqi people and perhaps to start a domino effect against other middle eastern dictatorships. all that really happened as a result of the invasion in the short run was saddam hussein was overthrown and the whole country was laid waste. the invasion took power away from the minority sunni moslems and gave it to the shi'a majority. >> it was essentially a disaster. the worst disaster. >> worse than saddam himself? >> definitely worse than saddam. >> the military campaign was devastating. political fallout was marred by carelessness and lack of interest. president bush, shortly before the invasion, seems not to know that iraq was split into sunni and shi'a. his secretary of defense dumped a len
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tung chee hwa is here. he is the chairman of the china united states exchange foundation. it aims to build greater understanding between the world's two largest economies. he is the former chief executive of hong kong, he has a long, close tie with the chinese leadership. he is currently vice chairman of the national committee of the chinese people's political consultant conference, the mainland's top political advisory body. i am very please
to start rebuilding. we want to make everything clean and tidy. we are asking the government to help us. >> but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected, and losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised initial payment of 120 pounds. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. she and all these children are living in classrooms next door. they and their families will be homeless again soon when school starts. >> let's round of some other main news. he said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. he was killed in 2005. he describes his words as a political accusation made too quickly. syria has always denied involvement. rescue teams have resumed their search for survivors of mud slide. authorities say 44 people have died. thousands more are at risk of flooding and landslides. south african trade unions have suspended their strike. more than 1 million civil servants will see the pay rise. union members say they will consider the latest offer. the spanish government has dismissed a cease-fire as insufficie
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
the government to help us. but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected and pakistan's losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised most affected families an initial payment of 150 pounds. woman backgive this her home. -- of this girl back home. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. these children and their families will be homeless again as school starts. >> the lebanese prime inner circle -- prime minister has saad hariri said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. mr. hariri has described his words as a political accusation made prematurely. he said lebanon and his -- and syria have historic relations and investigations into his father's killing have been misled by false testimony. rescue teams in guatemala removed -- resume their search for survivors after heavy mud slides and rain. authorities say at least 40 people have died. hundreds have been released -- remove from their homes and thousands more have been displaced by flooding and mudslides. more than 1 million civil servants walked out, de
supporters. the president is not under threat for now. >> he joins us now from caracas. the events are moving very quickly here. >> there has been a state of emergency declared by rafael correa. peru has closed its borders. hugo chavez has come out in support of rafael correa. he is calling the other left- wing nations for their support, too. >> and do we know where the president is right now? >> we believe he is in a hospital, you saw the images of pushing and shoving it with the president. he was on the streets. during that period, a tear gas canister was to run. he gave an interview saying a member of his entourage had been injured. he criticized heavily the protesters for using such tactics. he himself it was unharmed. he is in this hospital and staying there for the time being. >> how much can he rely on fellow politicians and the military? >> and extremely good question. the military is key in this at the moment. we have seen the head of the armed forces was unequivocal in to support of rafael correa. all of the constitutional rights that go with the state. we also know that there are d
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
facing the world. -- greatest threat facing the world. they would use chemical or nuclear weapons if they could. the chinese government ordered food producers to start growing more comfortable -- growing more vegetables. in mozambique, seven people died this week in protests about the 30% rise of the cost of bread. the un called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wild fires fanned by strong winds and more houses destroyed and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is a prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of russia's wheat crop. the government extended its ban on wheat exports to compensate. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's plight is starting to return to normal. the trigger was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. the government insisted it had no choice but to raise prices. seven people were killed. nearly 300 were injured. this has left extensive damage. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? the world saul price climbed -- saw pric
, it is the look of the winner in the u.s. presidential election. what ever choice the afghans make it, it will shape their future. bbc news, kabul. >> you're watching "bbc world news." still to come -- the mosque in a box. immobile per unit for the mobile muslim. prince william has graduated as our royal air force search and rescue helicopter pilot. he will now become part of the country's busiest search and rescue base off the coast of wales. >> he spent the past 19 months progressing through the raf training program. there have been stimulated rescue missions, the kind of operation he will soon be doing for real. flights over the atlantic where ships and yachts can run into trouble, and in the mountains of snow dunny aware every year his squadron is called out to -- snowdonia where every year his squadron is called out to rescue. he is now part of an operational rescue squadron, and the raf says he has done it on merit. >> he has completed the course successfully, with at least the minimum standards, if not better than that. he is here on his own right. >> initially, william will be
and they will do it. >> traditional rulers are better. they know our problems. they are dealing with us directly, so they know our problems. >> they are very careful with that. traditional rulers like to protect their personality. they tell you they will make sure. >> over the years, under both military and civilian rule, the power of these cheats and scammers has steadily been eroding. how did they continue -- the power of these chiefs and emirs has steadily been eroding. how do they continue their hold on power? >> date rule along with traditional institutions. it is not set in the media, but it is there. there are signs it will always be there and the people will always follow through on what the traditional institutions want. >> the history and culture of this place dates back centuries and little has changed in terms of tradition. i have come to meet an eim mir, granted a special audience. >> we do not order people to vote for anybody. all we do is ensure that our subjects do abide by the rule of the election. we do that to further the rule of the government. there should not be any discrim
. these reports come from one of the hardest hit areas. >> the families that used to live here have homes and a community, but it was all swept away. it is a sad indication of how desperate people are. every time there is a car they are hoping we are here to help. weeks after the disaster, most are dependent on handouts and have no means of helping themselves. >> at least someone got something by the government. that is why i can honestly tell you nobody has died of starting. >> it is not going as smoothly as the government says. there is not enough aid to go around. this descends into chaos. flood victims tired of waiting for food take matters into their own hands with dozens jumping onto the aid trucks. the decision is made to get the vehicle away from the rest of the crowd. a truck is driven down the highway filled with people still trying to cling on. some managed to get off some distance away. the incident illustrated dave plight of so many across this nation -- the pitiful plight. >> a military court of sri lanka convicted the former military chief of corruption. sarath fonseka was
father's successor. >> stay with us if you cannot on bbc world news. still to come -- a fifth of the world's plant species are now in danger of disappearing forever. first, she is said to be one of the most photographed people on our planet. a new exhibition of formal photographs document the life of britain's queen elizabeth in pictures. many were taken by her late sister's husband, the photographer lord snowden. >> on her right, mr. anthony armstrong jones. >> he was a society photographer who took pictures of the royals and then became one. tony armstrong jones's wedding to princess margaret was the society event of 1960. although he was not a member of the royal family, lord snowden continued to work as a professional photographer. alongside his documentary work, he was often called on to photograph the queen. many of his photographs have been included in a new exhibition, but the graphic portraits of the queen. here is an image of the monarch and her husband in the kind of formal pose you might expect, and the queen caught by a range of photographers' in less orthodox sur
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)